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Monday, January 31, 2011

CRAFTS WITH ANASTASIA-- CROSS STITCHED SNOWFLAKE BREADCOVER


Today’s craft project should probably be filed under, “If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.” I’ve shoveled enough snow since the day after Christmas to last me the rest of my life. Here in New Jersey, back on January 26th, we broke the record for the most snow ever in the month of January since they began keeping records. And we’ve already had more than four times the amount of snow we normally get for an entire winter!

The only time I like snow is when it’s not cold and wet -- like as a crafting motif. So today I bring you a cross stitched Snowflake Breadcover. The sample in the photo was stitched on a white 14-ct. Charles Craft Royal Classic Breadcover using DMC 3041 antique violet med., 826 blue med., and 3810 turquoise dk. for the snowflakes.

If you can’t find a pre-finished breadcover, you can use an 18” x 18” square of any 14-ct. cross stitch fabric that drapes nicely. Or use a 28-ct. fabric such as Charles Craft Monaco and work over two threads. Machine stitch ¼” around the fabric, then pull the threads to fringe. Begin stitching ¾” from side and bottom edges.

Print out the cross stitch chart and enlarge on a copy machine.

You can also substitute colors of your choice for the snowflakes. Reds, greens, and golds will work well for Christmas, but the colors I chose will enable you to use the breadcover throughout the winter.

Happy stitching!


3 comments:

Cindy B said...

Very pretty breadcover.

Janet said...

Well done, here in the midwest we are preparing for the biggest mess of the winter. I much prefer the breadcover to the "real" thing.

ANASTASIA POLLACK said...

Thanks, Cindy B!

Janet, that mess is headed this way. I'd much rather be cross stitching snowflakes than shoveling more of them.